Queer Page-a-Day

I work at a Queer Resource Center with a sizable collection of queer books.

Unfortunately, most are out of print, unavailable, unknown, or had very short print runs. I doubt many will ever be digitized.

Since I can't post entire books, I will be posting one random page a day from a random book on a shelf.

Non-fiction, fiction, YA, Children's - any genre is welcome, as long as the theme is (or relates) to queer.

Please submit a page or excerpt of a book you think should be posted. :)

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  1.  
  2. diversifying your queer reads: 2013 books featuring queer people with disabilities

    queerbookclub:

    Earlier this year I posted a list of books published in 2013 featuring queer people of color and trans people. At the time, I also asked for suggestions for 2013 books featuring queer people with disabilities (big thanks to everyone that responded!). Well, the year is almost half-way through, and while the list has slowly grown, it’s about time to share it.

    Unfortunately, it is still woefully short. If you have any suggestions I’m happy to add to this - remember, this is only books published in 2013, and only books featuring queer people with disabilities. These are also not personal recommendations, just every title I could find. Here’s the list, arranged by genre:

    Poetry

    • She Has a Name by Kamilah Aisha Moon

    Nonfic/Queer Studies/Memoir

    • Meaty: Essays by Samantha Irby
    • The End of San Francisco by Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore
    • Feminist, Queer, Crip by Alison Kafer

    Romance

    • Glitterland by Alexis Hall
    • Illumination by Rowan Speedwell
    • Never a Hero by Marie Sexton

    Young Adult

    • Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner

    SFF/Speculative Fiction

    • Sister Mine by Nalo Hopkinson
    • Ebenezer by JoSelle Vanderhooft
     
  3. adriennejournal:

Pre-Order Adrienne Issue 2 NOW! 
Featuring cover art by Ashley Inguanta and a portfolio of work from established and emerging self-identified queer women poets. Included in this issue is a significant amount of work from Alysia Angel, Jessica Rae Bergamino, Tamiko Beyer, Sossity Chircuzio, Cheryl Clarke, Theresa Davis, Leah Horlick, Laura Passin, Anne Marie Rooney, and Arisa White. Issue 02 features cover art by Ashley Inguanta. Edited by Valerie Wetlaufer and proudly published by Sibling Rivalry Press.

    adriennejournal:

    Pre-Order Adrienne Issue 2 NOW! 

    Featuring cover art by Ashley Inguanta and a portfolio of work from established and emerging self-identified queer women poets. Included in this issue is a significant amount of work from Alysia Angel, Jessica Rae Bergamino, Tamiko Beyer, Sossity Chircuzio, Cheryl Clarke, Theresa Davis, Leah Horlick, Laura Passin, Anne Marie Rooney, and Arisa White. Issue 02 features cover art by Ashley Inguanta. Edited by Valerie Wetlaufer and proudly published by Sibling Rivalry Press.

     
  4. theyoungdoyley:

Knights Errant: Pavane | Chapter One - Page Five
Hi-res link.
« Start from the beginning || Next »
Reblogs appreciated, as always! 

    theyoungdoyley:

    Knights Errant: Pavane | Chapter One - Page Five

    Hi-res link.

    « Start from the beginning || Next »

    Reblogs appreciated, as always! 

     
  5. diversifying your queer reads: 2013 books featuring queer people of color

    queerbookclub:

    It’s all too easy to fall into a pattern of only reading white authors. In 2013, I made a conscious effort to read more books by and about POC, but still, only ~30% of the books I read featured main characters of color and only ~22% were by authors of color. Here’s a list of books published in 2013 about QPOC - let’s celebrate these works and resolve to read more diversely.

    There’s no way this list is exhaustive, or even close. These are also not personal recommendations, just every title I could find. If I was unsure about a book’s contents (that is, if I was unsure if the queer characters were prominent, or if I thought the book might be exploitative), I tended to give weight to who the author is (that is, I was more likely to include books I know were written by people of color). Of course, I’ll be happy to add books to the list if you have any suggestions that fit the theme! Here’s what I found, arranged by genre:

    Fiction

    • Abandoned Property by Kai Mann
    • The Butterfly Lady by Danny M. Hoey Jr.
    • The City of Devi by Manil Suri
    • Corona by Busha Rehman
    • Full Circle by Skyy
    • Harlem Boyz by Mr. Armani Williams
    • K-Rho: The Sweet Taste of Sisterhood by LaToya Hankins
    • Midnight Rumba by Eduardo Santiago
    • Monarch Season by Mario López-Cordero
    • My Education by Susan Choi
    • On the Come Up by Hannah Weye


    Romance

    • Broken in Soft Places by Fiona Zedde
    • The Exchange by Nikki Rashan
    • Flawless by Cat Grant
    • Hersband Material by C. Wash
    • Turn Me Out by T. Ariez
    • Wallflower by Heidi Belleau


    Mystery

    • How to Greet Strangers by Joyce Thompson
    • The Odd Fellows by Guillermo Luna
    • The Scottish Banker of Surabaya by Ian Hamilton


    Sci-Fi/Fantasy/Horror

    • Ascension: A Tangled Axon Novel by Jacqueline Koyanagi
    • Hungry Ghost by Alison Moon
    • Midnight Comes with the Dawn: The Vampyir Plague by Darlene Burns
    • Selume Proferre by E.E. Ottoman
    • Sister Mine by Nalo Hopkinson


    Young Adult

    • Adamant by Kieran Wisser
    • Afuera: A Young Latino’s Journey by Marcelino Rosas
    • The Culling by Steven Dos Santos
    • Fat Angie by E.E. Charlton-Trujillo
    • If You Could Be Mine by Sara Farizan
    • Open Mic: Riffs on Life Between Cultures edited by Mitali Perkins
    • Proxy by Alex London
    • The Second Mango by Shira Glassman
    • Stay Solid: A Radical Handbook for Youth edited by Matt Hern
    • The Summer Prince by Alaya Dawn Johnson


    Middle Grade

    • Marco Impossible by Hannah Moskowitz


    Comics

    • #Gezi Park by Beldan Sezen
    • Mara by Brian Wood and Ming Doyle
    • Wandering Son Vol. 5 by Shimura Takako and Matt Thorn


    Memoir

    • Darling: A Spiritual Autobiography by Richard Rodriguez
    • Domestically Cursed: A Story on Partnership Violence by Renair Amin
    • Harley Loco: A Memoir of Hard Living, Hair, and Post-Punk, from the Middle East to the Lower East Side by Rayya Elias
    • Making Mr. Wright: Memoirs of a Black Female-To-Male Transsexual by Reno Prestige Wright
    • They Call Me a Hero: A Memoir of My Youth by Daniel Hernandez and Susan Goldman Rubin
    • Trauma Queen by Lovemmee Corazon


    Nonfiction/Queer Studies

    • Amigas y Amantes: Sexually Nonconforming Latinas Negotiate Family by Katie L. Acosta
    • Among the Bloodpeople: Politics and Flesh by Thomas Glave
    • Bi: Notes for a Bisexual Revolution, by Shiri Eisner
    • Brown Boys and Rice Queens: Spellbinding Performance in the Asias by Eng-Beng Lim
    • Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene by Gerald H. Gaskin
    • Living Out Islam: Voices of Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Muslims by Scott Siraj al-Haqq Kugle
    • Oye Loca! From the Mariel Boatlift to Gay Cuban Miami by Susana Pena
    • A People Stronger: The Collectivization of MSM and TG groups in India by Suneeta Singh
    • Professed Selves: Transsexuality and Same-Sex Desire in Contemporary Iran by Afsaneh Najmabadi
    • Queer African Reader by Sokari Ekine
    • Queer in Aztlan: Chicano Male Recollentions of Consciousness and Coming Out edited by Adelaida R. Del Castillo and Gibran Guido
    • Queer Jihad: LGBT Muslims on Coming Out, Activism, and the Faith by Afdhere Jama
    • Queer Migration Politics by Karma Chavez
    • Queer Narratives of the Caribbean Diaspora by Zoran Pecics
    • An UnSpoken Compromise: A Spiritual Guide for LGBT People of Faith by Rizi Xavier Timane Ph.D


    Short Stories

    • Dykin 2 by Neledi Tafari
    • Fairytales for Lost Children by Diriye Osman
    • Happiness, Like Water by Chinelo Okparanta
    • Mundo Cruel by Luis Negron
    • Queer Africa: New and Collected Fiction by Karen Martin and Makhosazana Xaba
    • Sistagirl by Anondra Williams


    Poetry

    • Alternative Medicine by Rafael Campo
    • Autogeography by Reginald Harris
    • Brown Femme Survivor by Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha
    • Chopper! Chopper! Poetry from Bordered Lives by Veronica Reyes
    • Proxy by R. Erika Doyle
    • She Has a Name by Kamilah Aisha Moon
    • Sinuous by Lydia Kwa
    • Wanting in Arabic: Second Edition by Trish Salah
    • We Come Elemental by Tamiko Beyer
    • A Word for the Open Mouth by Kenyata C. Garner
    • The World Will Follow Joy: Turning Madness into Flowers by Alice Walker


    Many thanks to Sistahs on the Shelves, Lambda Literary, and everyone that reads, reviews & tags queer books on tumblr and goodreads - without whom this list would be much more difficult to compile! Last year’s list can be found here.

     
  6. Queer webcomic review

    lovemeunlovely:

    The Princess [link]: Adorable webcomic about a gradeschool-aged transgirl. Includes multiple trans characters (including a nonbinary best friend person!), and the protagonist is bisexual. Just frickin adorably amazingly awesomely cute. TW for nonexplicit depictions of abuse. 

    Menage a 3 (ma3) [link]: TW for transmisogyny, misogyny, rape culture, and nonconsent passed off as wacky antics. Gross. Hugely gross. Like, I-can’t-believe-this-was-premeditated gross. Includes the phrase “is she really a man” within the first 40 pages. Also includes canonically bisexual and gay characters who still act grossly and apparently there’s a translady later in the comic. I don’t know if it’s still running. Cast seems to be all white. 

    Curvy [link]: TW for lots and lots of explicit sex. Like, a lot. Definitely NSFW. A cute fantasty comic with some unique world-building where everybody seems to be canonically bisexual. Gender isn’t really discussed although there is one trans-man side character who’s gender is never invalidated ever so that was cool. Includes characters of color, one of the main protagonists is black. Still running, I would definitely recommend this one. 

    Girls With Slingshots [link]: Cute slice-of-life comic with recurring queer characters. Adorable depiction of an asexual relationship. Cissexist in a trans-people-don’t-seem-to-exist-here way. Unfortunately binarist, has a tendency to break characters off into “boys” and “girls” groups. I still totally follow it though. Still running. Includes characters of color, but cast is overwhelmingly white. 

    Go Get A Roomie [link]: TW for some serious dudebro-ish antics on the part of the lesbian protagonist and cissexism in the form of trans people not generally existing and equating body parts to gender. You meet one trans character early on, once and never again, and much is made of the fact that he “doesn’t have boobs anymore”. Cue cisfuckery. Also sex happens a lot. It gets better though, mostly. I forgave it it’s problematic stuff for sake of some neat fantasy elements and a cute art style and the fact that it included so many lesbians. Cast is overwhelmingly but not exclusively white and one of the main characters uses a wheelchair. Still running. 

    Penny and Aggie [link]: Shares an author with Ma3 and is surprisingly tolerable despite this. Lots of wacky teenage girl antics, some hard core Not Like Other Girls syndrome but passes the Benchdel test. Main protagonists and antagonists are girls. Cissexist in a trans-people-don’t-seem-to-exist-here way. Includes canonically queer characters. I don’t know if it’s still running, I noped-out after the only two characters with mental illness turned out to be murderous lunatics. Largely but not exclusively white cast. 

    Red String [link]: Largely centered around the trails and tribulation of a cishet couple, but one of the main characters is a lesbian and her story-arch does a pretty good job of portraying the whole coming-out-as-a-teenager thing. Some sexual content, rarely explicit. Cast is overwhelmingly Japanese which makes sense because the comic is set in a series of Japanese highschools. Finished running. 

    Questionable Content [link]: Another cute slice-of-life comic, notable for its multiple recurring queer characters and talking robots. Despite relying largely on butt jokes and slapstic for humor it’s refreshingly free of “lol girls/boys don’t do that isn’t it funny that you’re doing that” punchlines. Also bonus points for portraying OCD accurately. Includes one translady who is handled respectfully and carefully by the author. She’s believable and multidimensional and hella cute. Still running. 

     

    A Softer World [link]: TW for depression and suicide. One of my favourite comics. Has some recurring queer themes but is largely a depression comic. I just love it okay. Still running. 

    YU + ME [link]: TW for depression, suicide, violence (especially later on) and depictions of abuse. A fantasy webcomic that starts out looking like a highschool lesbian drama. Lots of lesbians. Did I mention lesbians. Overwhelmingly lesbians. Cissexist in that trans people don’t exist even in magical fantasy realms which kind of irritates me. The artist does some neat things with swapping out art styles after the highschool part of the comic is concluded. Cast is mostly white, includes some narratively important characters of color. The main antagonist is a Japanese woman with a really neat story arch. Finished running. 

    DAR [link]: A comic about a college-aged lesbian. Cissexist in a trans-people-don’t-really-exist way. Often funny, often cute. I don’t have a lot to say about this one because I haven’t read it all the way through but it’s often recommended so I thought I’d include it. Author also does some adorable sex-toy reviews and PSA comics. 

     
  7. niaking:

Page 72 from Ryka Aoki’s Seasonal Velocities.
     
  8. queerbookclub:

    Queer books out in August 2013. Know any others?

    [Image description: ten book covers, including Love In the Time of Global Warming by Francesca Lia Block, Oye Loca: From the Mariel Boatlift to Gay Cuban Miami by Susana Peña, My 1980s & Other Essays by Wayne Koestenbaum, One Hundred Apocalypses and Other Apocalypses by Lucy Corin, This Assignment Is So Gay: LGBTIQ Poets on the Art of Teaching edited by Megan Volpert, If You Could Be Mine by Sara Farizan, Not Your Mother’s Meatloaf: A Sex Education Comic Book edited by Saiya Miller and Liza Bley, Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan, Pressure Head by JL Merrow, Sexuality and Social Justice in Africa: Rethinking Homophobia and Forging Resistance by Marc Epprecht.]

     
  9. queerbookclub:

    Queer books out in July 2013. Know any others?

    [Image description: ten book covers, including Among the Bloodpeople: Politics and Flesh by Thomas Glave, Love, Dishonor, Marry, Die, Cherish, Perish by David Rakoff, Bi-Normal by MC Higgins, On the Come Up by Hannah Weyer, Bi: Notes for a Bisexual Revolution by Shiri Eisner, The Ha-Ha by Jennifer Dawson, Bread & Wine: an Erotic Tale of New York by Samuel R. Delany and Mia Wolff, Queens of Noise: The Real Story of the Runaways by Evelyn McDonell, The Road to Her by KE Payne and Schistong by Annie Rachele Lanzillotto.]

    Bread & Wine and The Ha-Ha are reissues of previously published books. I usually don’t include those, but these two made the cut via my totally subjective judging process. Also, I was short on new-new books this month.

     
  10. 
In a recent interview, two Queer authors of Color discuss their books and memoirs.
Toni Newman, trans author, discusses her memoir, I Rise: The Transformation of Toni Newman. She discusses the challenges she’s faced as a Black transgender woman from a happy Christian two-parent home, as a fitness model living a dual life, and making the transition from male to female. She discusses her work as a professional and sex worker, where she encountered celebs such as rapper LL Cool J, comedian Eddie Murphy, and DJ Mister Cee. Portions of I Risewill be turned into the first memoir-turned-screenplay by a transgender African American; the upcoming film Erotic Professionals will be directed by Keith Holland.
read more

    In a recent interview, two Queer authors of Color discuss their books and memoirs.

    Toni Newman, trans author, discusses her memoir, I Rise: The Transformation of Toni Newman. She discusses the challenges she’s faced as a Black transgender woman from a happy Christian two-parent home, as a fitness model living a dual life, and making the transition from male to female. She discusses her work as a professional and sex worker, where she encountered celebs such as rapper LL Cool J, comedian Eddie Murphy, and DJ Mister Cee. Portions of I Risewill be turned into the first memoir-turned-screenplay by a transgender African American; the upcoming film Erotic Professionals will be directed by Keith Holland.

    read more

    (Source: )

     
  11. neutrois:

    TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterlywill be the journal of record for the vibrant, rapidly evolving interdisciplinary field of Transgender Studies—and you can be part of its groundbreaking debut in 2014.  It will be co-edited by Dr. Susan Stryker (University of Arizona) and Dr. Paisley Currah (CUNY-Brooklyn), and published by Duke University Press.

    This project began in 2008, when we were invited to co-edit a special transgender studies edition of Women’s Studies Quarterly. We received more than two hundred submissions for publication, yet we could only publish twelve of them. We knew then that it was time for transgender studies to have its own high-profile publications venue. Five years later, there is still no place to accommodate the kind of conversation we want to foster on transgender issues. Your support right now could change that. 

    Only a few days left! Please support this important effort to further the trans community’s presence (for and by trans people) in Research Journals. These articles will likely be used as “supporting evidence” for everything from social policies to health guidelines to media empowerment for years to come.

     
  12. bisexual-community:

    bialogue-group:

    Says Bisexual Author and Activist Yemisi Ilesanmi

    I am a passionate human rights activist, trade unionist, poet, and advocate for equal rights, social justice and poverty alleviation. I hold a Master of Law degree in Gender, Sexuality and Human Rights. I write and speak on a range of issues including workers rights, gender and sexuality issues.

    I coordinate the group Nigerian LGBTIs in Diaspora Against Anti Same-Sex Laws. The group was formed in 2011 when Nigerian Senate resuscitated interest in the homophobic bill entitled ‘Same Sex Marriage Prohibition’ bill, which seeks to criminalize not just same-sex marriage as the name implies, but also same sex relationship and activities including advocacy on LGBT rights or aiding and abetting anyone suspected of engaging in Same-Sex relationships. It stipulates 14 years jail term for anyone who engages in same sex relationship and a 10 year jail term for anyone who aids, abets same sex persons, it also criminalizes any advocacy on LGBT rights, (sign petition against this here)

    The ‘Jail the Gays’ bill personally affects me because I identify as a Bisexual.

    In my book Freedom to love all: Homosexuality is not Un-African, I take a critical look at Nigeria’s ‘Jail the Gays’ bill. I dissect the many homophobic public statements attributed to lawmakers, religious leaders and politicians. And I make a case for LGBT Rights as Human Rights and debunk the myths surrounding homosexuality in Africa. 

    Sexuality rights remain a controversial issue in many parts of Africa. It is not just a controversial issue but also a taboo subject. African societies do not provide enabling environments to discuss sexual orientation issues. Homosexuality is condemned by many African leaders as Immoral, Un-African and a ‘White man’s disease’. Many countries in Africa still criminalize homosexuality. Sodomy laws remain part of the criminal laws thereby making it legally possible to persecute sexual minorities. For example Zimbabwe, Kenya, Uganda, Nigeria, Tanzania and Ghana all have laws under which homosexuality can be prosecuted. In South Africa, where the constitution recognizes same-sex relationships, gays and lesbians are often attacked, molested and persecuted for their sexual orientation.

    My book protests the criminalization of LGBTS, and challenges human right activists to defend human rights of everyone irrespective of gender, religion or sexual orientation.

    ^^this is what a bisexual activist looks like

     
  13. queerbookclub:

    Queer books out in in June 2013. Know any others?

    [Image description: ten book covers, including Damn Love by Jasmine Beach-Ferrara, Something Like Autumn by Jay Bell, Love Alters: Lesbian Love Stories edited by Emma Donoghue, Proxy by Alex London, Gender and Sexuality for Beginners by Jaimee Garbacik and Jeffrey Lewis, Wilde Stories 2013 edited by Steve Berman, Staging Social Justice: Collaborating to Create Activist Theater edited by Norma Bowles and Daniel-Raymond Nadon, Fairyland: A Memoir of my Father by Alysia Abbott, Queers Dig Time Lords edited by Sigrid Ellis and Michael Damian Thomas, and The Daughter Star by Susan Jane Bigelow.]

     
  14. housingworksbookstore:

emilybooks:

If you’re in NYC on May 13, come celebrate Sarah Schulman’s novel Empathy, our April book club pick, with the author and Barbara Browning, who’s also the author of two Emily Books picks.  We’re also thrilled to be cohosting the event with literary event crowdfunding resource Togather, which is buying everyone’s first drink (Thanks, Togather!) By posing a big, unanswerable question we hope to spark a conversation that will leave everyone with more questions. We’re also excited to host a conversation between two novelists who, in very different ways, dazzle and tantalize readers and provoke lingering thoughts about identity.We hope to see you there, and if you can’t make it, we’ll catch you up afterwards right here! 

Super-excited about this, mark it on your calendar in PEN.

    housingworksbookstore:

    emilybooks:

    If you’re in NYC on May 13, come celebrate Sarah Schulman’s novel Empathy, our April book club pick, with the author and Barbara Browning, who’s also the author of two Emily Books picks.  We’re also thrilled to be cohosting the event with literary event crowdfunding resource Togather, which is buying everyone’s first drink (Thanks, Togather!) 

    By posing a big, unanswerable question we hope to spark a conversation that will leave everyone with more questions. We’re also excited to host a conversation between two novelists who, in very different ways, dazzle and tantalize readers and provoke lingering thoughts about identity.

    We hope to see you there, and if you can’t make it, we’ll catch you up afterwards right here! 

    Super-excited about this, mark it on your calendar in PEN.

     
  15. theunknownpainter:

Hahaha oh, the beautiful irony. This book is great.

    theunknownpainter:

    Hahaha oh, the beautiful irony. This book is great.